Accessory: Cellular Telephone

From 3000GT/Stealth Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Excerpt from the 1993 Mitsubishi Accessories brochure. Phone handset shown mounted in the center console storage under the arm rest.
Excerpt from the 1993 3000GT sales brochure describing the cellular telephone accessory.

A Cellular Telephone accessory was available in the 1992 and 1993 model years of the 3000GT/Stealth, making use of a DiamondTel Model 92 portable cellular phone (US market confirmed via documents; other markets unknown). This was not a direct factory option, but an official dealer-installed accessory supported by factory wiring in the car and a special install kit.

Discussion[edit]

Use this companion thread on the 3si Forums to discuss the Cellular Telephone Accessory:
Factory Cellular Telephone Accessory (DiamondTel Model 92) - 3SWiki Companion Thread

DiamondTel Model 92 Cellular Telephone[edit]

The DiamondTel Model 92 Cellular Telephone is an off-the-shelf cellular phone that can be used as a transportable phone with battery power, or installed in a vehicle as a mobile phone (in the early definition of "mobile" meaning "vehicle-mounted") using a generic mobile installation kit. The phone used analog Advanced Mobile Phone System (AMPS) technology, which was phased out in favor of newer digital technologies starting in 2008. There are no cell phone service providers that can activate this phone.

NOTE: The official installation into the 3000GT uses some special components not included in the generic mobile kit, and connects to factory vehicle wiring instead of using a generic wiring pigtail.

Sales Brochure[edit]

Download a PDF scan of an original sales brochure for the telephone:
thumb|DiamondTel Model 92 Brochure PDF

Operating Instructions Manual[edit]

Download a PDF scan of the original Operating Instructions manual for the telephone here for full details of the phone's features, diagrams of parts/accessories, etc.:
DiamondTel Model 92 Cellular Phone Operating Instruction Manual PDF

Battery[edit]

A battery pack allows the phone to be used in transportable mode. The Transportable Cover in which the battery is installed also contains a battery charging circuit that recharges the battery whenever external power is provided.

Part Number: FZ-1031A (Also used with the Mitsubishi Model 1500 phone)
Voltage: 6V (x2)
Capacity: 1.4Ah (1400MAh)
Type: NiCD


Inside of the pack are ten size "A" 1.2V 1400MAh flat-top NiCD battery cells. The cells are arranged into two banks of five cells (6V per bank), with a thermal fuse in series between two cells on each bank. Each bank of cells is completely independent with its own dedicated pair of terminals exposed on the battery pack. It's basically two separate 6V battery packs in one case.

Rebuild with New Battery Cells[edit]

All original battery packs are undoubtedly dead and unusable by now. It is possible to split the case open at the seam without too much damage so that the battery cells can be replaced.

Parts:

  • Size "A" 1.2V 1400MAh flat-top NiCD battery cells (x10).
  • Nickel strips. I used 0.15x6x50mm strips and cut them shorter as needed.

AC/DC Power Supply[edit]

If you want to test the phone and/or charge its battery pack outside of the car, then you'll want an AC/DC power supply.

Part Number: FZ-1035A (Also used with the Mitsubishi Model 1500 phone)
Input: 120V AC, 60Hz, 32W
Output: 12V DC, 2A

Make One From a Donor[edit]

If you can't find an original AC/DC power supply, then you can make your own by sacrificing any AC/DC power supply with the same output specs, and modify it using the appropriate connector:

Vehicle Integration Overview[edit]

The cellular telephone accessory is integrated into the vehicle with a combination of factory plug-n-play wiring connectors and special modules/components to provide hands-free telephone conversation functionality:

  • A "Hands-Free Module" mounted on the steering column includes a microphone, a button for answering/ending calls, and 3 speed dial buttons.
    • Part Number MB876733 from Mitsubishi Electric Corporation.
    • Also known as "Hands-Free Controller Box" or "Hand Free Microphone"
  • A handset cradle and mounting bracket installed in the center console storage under the arm rest.
  • A telephone wire is already routed from the center console area to the trunk area for easy installation of the telephone handset cradle in the front of the vehicle to be connected to the phone transceiver in the trunk.
  • A "Hands-Free Controller Unit" in the trunk integrates the telephone transceiver with the "Hands Free Module", the telephone handset, and the factory radio/speakers.
    • Part Number MB876742 from Mitsubishi Electric Corporation.
  • The phone powers on/off automatically with vehicle switched power.
  • When in a call, the radio is automatically muted and the phone audio is sent to the front right speakers of the vehicle.

Vehicle Wiring/Connectors[edit]

Diagrams[edit]

These are component diagrams and circuit diagrams from the Factory Service Manual related to the Cellular Telephone accessory.

NOTE: Telephone-related wiring/connectors is only present in 1992-1993 model years.

Photos of Factory Wiring/Connectors[edit]

These photos provide a good reference for where to find all of the Cellular Telephone connectors in the car.

Jumper Connector for Front Right Speakers[edit]

One of the connectors in the trunk area allows the Hands-Free Controller Unit to intercept the audio to the front right speakers so that phone audio can be sent to the front right speakers. When not in a call, the Hands-Free Controller Unit acts as a pass-through for the normal audio from the radio. If nothing is plugged into this connector, then the circuit to the front right speakers is incomplete, and there will be no audio from the radio. The car comes from the factory with a jumper connector to simply complete the circuit to the front right speakers.

If you have a 92-93 3000GT/Stealth with non-functional front right speakers, then it is possible that the Cellular Telephone accessory was previously installed, then removed without re-installing the jumper connector. You can fix this by making a replacement jumper connector using part# 174931 from TE Connectivity. See above photos for guidance on positioning of wires within the connector.

Power Supply Wiring[edit]

The factory wiring for the Cellular Telephone does not have the correct style of connector to plug directly into the transceiver's power supply socket. The official install kit included an extension/adapter wiring harness.

If you cannot find an original power supply extension/adapter, then you can make your own with the following parts:

  • Yazaki 7122-8345 (vehicle-side connector)
    • US-based source that sells in small quantities: Corsa Technic (includes terminals)
    • UK-based source that sells in small quantities: AutoClick (includes terminals)
  • Molex 39-01-2040 (transceiver-side connector) with Molex 39-00-0208 terminals
    • Alternatively, use Molex 39-01-3045 if you prefer a black connector.
    • Readily available from popular online electronic component supply stores (Mouser, DigiKey, Newark, etc.)
  • 1/4" PVC wiring sleeve (25 inches).
  • Wire (26-3/4 inches x 3, 18 AWG).

Alternate Handset Installation with Readily Available Aftermarket Mount[edit]

If you can't find the correct OEM bracket for mounting the handset under the arm rest, then you can use the PanaVise Model# 727-06SF Slimline Small Foot Pedestal Mount instead. The PanaVise Slimline line of mounts was first introduced in 1988[1], so this mount should be very close to a period-correct aftermarket mount for our early 90's cars.

Use four black screws, size 8-32 x 1/2", with matching size washers and nuts to bolt down the foot of the mount.

OEM Location[edit]

The PanaVise Model# 727-06SF Slimline Small Foot Pedestal Mount can be used to position the handset in the OEM location under the arm rest.

Alternate Location (side of center console)[edit]

The PanaVise Model# 727-06SF Slimline Small Foot Pedestal Mount can also be used to position the handset on the side of the center console. The side carpet piece must be removed to bolt the foot of the mount onto it. The plastic backing of the carpet is quite sturdy and supports the mount and handset well. Position the handset carefully so that the glove box can be opened.

Pros:

  • The handset is on full display for maximum enjoyment as a conversation starter.
  • Does not take up space in the arm rest storage compartment.
  • This is a typical aftermarket install location for car phone handsets, so it is "period correct".
  • If the phone was hypothetically usable, then this location is more readily/conveniently accessible than under the arm rest.

Cons:

  • Intrudes into passenger leg room slightly.
  • Interferes with sliding the passenger seat forward to access the rear seat area. Definitely unhook the handset from the cradle and set it aside on the center console before sliding the passenger seat forward to avoid damaging the handset cord. The foot of the mount may also still prevent the seat from sliding all the way forward, depending on exactly where you position it.
  • It's not the official OEM location.

Alternate Transceiver Install without Hands-Free Controller Unit[edit]

If you can't find the Hands-Free Controller Unit, it's still possible to install the transceiver in the trunk of the car so that it is otherwise fully functional (connected to vehicle power, and connected to the handset). Simply plug the telephone wire in the trunk directly into the transceiver, and tuck the 2 connectors for the Hands-Free Controller Unit underneath as shown in the pictures. A Hands-Free Controller Unit can easily be added later if you find one. Be sure to leave the Jumper Connector for Front Right Speakers connected.

NOTE: This alternate install still requires the Power Supply Wiring.

Finding Parts[edit]

Finding all the parts needed for a complete Cellular Telephone Accessory install is quite a challenge. Be prepared for a long search, and purchases of additional phone systems with duplicate parts just to get that one specific part included that you need. Here's some tips on finding some of the parts.

The Phone Itself[edit]

The DiamondTel Model 92 itself is relatively easy to find because it was available as an off-the-shelf consumer product. Try searching eBay and other auction sites, sale/swap sites, etc., with the following search terms:

  • "DiamondTel Model 92"
  • "Diamond Tel Model 92" (common misspelling with an unnecessary space in DiamondTel)
  • "fm-4036f03" (part number of the Transceiver)
  • "DiamondTel phone" or "Diamond Tel phone" (captures listings where people didn't know the model number, but will also find other models of phones)

Most listings will include at least a complete phone in "transportable mode":

  • Transceiver
  • Transportable Cover with Battery
  • Handset

Some listings may include additional parts that you need:

  • Handset cradle
  • Transceiver mounting plate

Some listing may include other unnecessary extras that you may like:

  • Leather carrying bag
  • Operation Instructions
  • Removeable antenna (for transportable mode)

Transceiver Mounting Plate[edit]

The transceiver mounting plate is a less common item that is unlikely to be found by itself. If you can't find it with The Phone Itself, then your best bet is to search for other products that use the same mounting plate:

  • Mitsubishi Model 1500 (another model of phone with a lot of interchangeability with the Model 92)
  • DiamondTel 3W Booster Kit (part number: BK-99X)

Handset Cradle[edit]

Like the Transceiver Mounting Plate, the cradle is a less common item that is unlikely to be found by itself. If you are lucky, then you'll find it with The Phone Itself.

NOTE: Don't worry about the wires that may or may not be included with the cradle. There's a phone cable that is part of the factory wiring of the car that gets installed into the cradle directly, so any wires that come with the cradle you find will be removed anyway.

There is also a compatible handset cradle (part number: SZ130A) for Mitsubishi Satellite Phones (ST211, ST221M). It's not identical, though. Here's some differences, compared to the correct cradle for the DiamondTel Model 92:

  • Slimmer side profile.
  • Channel on back for the cable, allowing it to be mounted directly onto a large flat surface (irrelevant for in-car mounting).
  • Only one opening for the phone cable jack (fine for install with factory wiring, because only the phone cable jack is needed in this setup)
    • The Model 92 cradle also has an opening for a microphone jack, and a punch-out to allow for an RJ-11 jack for connecting a portable fax machine (requires an optional RJ-11 jack to be installed/enabled in the transceiver, and an additional phone cable between the cradle and transceiver).

Hands-Free Module, Hands-Free Controller Unit, Cradle Bracket, Power Supply Wiring[edit]

These are all the unicorn parts that were specific to the factory-supported plug-n-play installation of the Cellular Telephone Accessory into the 3000GT/Stealth. I have had very little luck finding these parts at all, let alone finding them for sale (in nearly 1 year of searching, I was able to buy one set of these parts, minus the cradle bracket, and the Hands-Free Controller Unit was severely water damaged). In my searching, I have found several old discussions about these parts that usually involve laughing about them and immediately ripping them out of the car to throw them in the trash because they were old enough to be outdated/worthless, but not old enough to have nostalgic value yet.

It may help your search to know that these parts were also used for a Cellular Telephone Accessory in the Mitsubishi Diamante and Montero (exact years unknown). It's unknown whether other Mitsubishi vehicles had this option.

Keep your eyes peeled for evidence of Cellular Telephone Accessory parts in 1992-1993 3000GT/Stealth for sale, in Facebook 3000GT/Stealth group discussions, junk yard cars, etc.

If You Can't Find These Parts[edit]

You can still install/enjoy the rest of the phone system if you can't find these parts. Follow these links for more details:

References[edit]